Elad Guterman

First off, let me apologize for the tiny jpegs in this post. I stumbled across the work of Elad Guterman today but it seems all the images I’ve found online from his website are in webpage format (which I don’t have the smarts to alter). So be aware that this is a small sampling of his portfolio and that I highly recommend checking out both his website and his instagram feed.

Born in Israeli and currently living on a kibbutz in the northern part of that country Guterman graduated from the Tel Hai Arts Institute, Jewellery. He collects his raw materials mostly from his work and home environments and describes some of his process here…

‘Everything around me, everything that is thrown, broken, spoiled, rusted, is raw material for me, I start with clay, the material is the first inspiration, now what does it remind me’

‘A shelf from tin turns into trees, scraps of iron become flowers, houses look like an old wooden surface turns into wings – the process by which ostensibly waste becomes an aesthetic concept and takes on a different meaning, personal and emotional’

I don’t know about you but I have only a vague idea about what life is like on a kibbutz (which means ‘gathering’) so I did a little research and found this via https://www.touristisrael.com

‘A kibbutz is a type of settlement which is unique to Israel. A collective community, traditionally based on agriculture, the first kibbutz was called Deganya and was founded by pioneers in 1910. Today, there are over 270 kibbutzim in Israel and they have diversified greatly since their agricultural beginnings with many now privatized. Regardless of their status, the kibbutz offers a unique insight into Israeli society, and are fascinating places to visit’.

Of course it’d take more than a blog post to delve into the complexities of all that Israel is today but I’m guessing that the first zionists wanting to settle there encountered a lot of hardship in turning previously inhospitable land into agriculturally thriving communities (not that all kibbutzim are strickly agriculture-based these days). They had to start from scratch. I sense that same ethos in Guterman’s work. It’s raw and hand-produced from whatever materials he can source. Waste is given new purpose. I particularly love his casting setup which you can see on his website. Unlike moi who complains bitterly about having to drive 40 kms. to get my stuff cast by a company in Vancouver, this maker has built his own forge/form equipment; just way more basic and immediate and therefore cooler. Check him out.

Castings in Aluminum



Ring VIII. Silver, Reused Wood

Detail: Wall Sculpture. Metal & Iron Waste

Canteen IV. Alpacca, Rubber. 54x22x15
Table, Wood. 2013. 25x58x28, 46x40x25, 64x30x25
Necklace. Silver, Alpaqua, Copper


Paul Cocksedge Studio

Being somewhat of a bender of silver I find things made of metal eye-catching. That might explain why I found this image from Paul Cocksedge Studio so captivating. It shows a gently curving thousand pounds of rolled steel balanced, like a sheet of paper captured the moment it touches a horizontal plane and just before it slides out of reach (if you still use paper you’ll know how it can sometimes get away from you…if you’ve ever dropped a sheet I mean) ). So how does unyielding steel bend like that? According to Cocksedge ‘Poised’ is the result of ‘intensive series of calculations regarding gravity, mass, and equilibrium’. I bet it took some heat too.

‘Poised’, 2013. Paul Cocksedge Studio / Friedman Benda Gallery

To explore these and other projects check out Paul Cocksedge Studio. You can also find them on Instagram here.

‘Compression Sofa’, 2016. For Moooi – Milan Design Week
Rhythm Shelf, 2015. For Greenstein Lab Library, Seattle



Rhythm Shelf, 2015. For Greenstein Lab Library, Seattle

Alex White – Furniture Maker

I’d love to have a friend who also happened to be a furniture maker; someone I could share a pint with as I casually pulled out some quick sketches of a table or a chair or some shelving from my bag, pieces I’d been dreaming of but couldn’t make myself. If Alex White  wasn’t so busy winning awards for innovative furniture pieces, doing private commissions and making pubic art he could be that friend. I guess that pint and my dreams will have to wait.

White opened his own studio in 2013, 3 years after studying 3-D design at Falmouth University in Cornwall, but not before being mentored for 2 years by furniture artist  Fred Baier and later Paul Cocksedge. Now, let me be honest here; neither of these names meant anything to me until today but if you’re into art furniture or cutting edge design respectively pleeeeeaaaase check out these 2 makers while you’re here. I’ll be featuring Paul Cocksedge in a future post.

Tradition and technique with innovation are important to White. He says “I love the old ways, but I don’t rely on them. It’s important to keep pushing the boundaries”. He sets materials like perspex against wood that’s built in a traditional Japanese method (without the use of screws or glue), giving it a contemporary aesthetic. And who knew you could crimp boring old steel tube as he does in his “Kinky” series. He’s best known for his Monroe chair though, which, as you might have guessed was inspired by the dress of a certain hollywood actress. Check out his website for sure.

 

 

 

 

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Monroe Chair

PST-MM-2T

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Kinky Chair

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Topnotch Desk