Elad Guterman

First off, let me apologize for the tiny jpegs in this post. I stumbled across the work of Elad Guterman today but it seems all the images I’ve found online from his website are in webpage format (which I don’t have the smarts to alter). So be aware that this is a small sampling of his portfolio and that I highly recommend checking out both his website and his instagram feed.

Born in Israeli and currently living on a kibbutz in the northern part of that country Guterman graduated from the Tel Hai Arts Institute, Jewellery. He collects his raw materials mostly from his work and home environments and describes some of his process here…

‘Everything around me, everything that is thrown, broken, spoiled, rusted, is raw material for me, I start with clay, the material is the first inspiration, now what does it remind me’

‘A shelf from tin turns into trees, scraps of iron become flowers, houses look like an old wooden surface turns into wings – the process by which ostensibly waste becomes an aesthetic concept and takes on a different meaning, personal and emotional’

I don’t know about you but I have only a vague idea about what life is like on a kibbutz (which means ‘gathering’) so I did a little research and found this via https://www.touristisrael.com

‘A kibbutz is a type of settlement which is unique to Israel. A collective community, traditionally based on agriculture, the first kibbutz was called Deganya and was founded by pioneers in 1910. Today, there are over 270 kibbutzim in Israel and they have diversified greatly since their agricultural beginnings with many now privatized. Regardless of their status, the kibbutz offers a unique insight into Israeli society, and are fascinating places to visit’.

Of course it’d take more than a blog post to delve into the complexities of all that Israel is today but I’m guessing that the first zionists wanting to settle there encountered a lot of hardship in turning previously inhospitable land into agriculturally thriving communities (not that all kibbutzim are strickly agriculture-based these days). They had to start from scratch. I sense that same ethos in Guterman’s work. It’s raw and hand-produced from whatever materials he can source. Waste is given new purpose. I particularly love his casting setup which you can see on his website. Unlike moi who complains bitterly about having to drive 40 kms. to get my stuff cast by a company in Vancouver, this maker has built his own forge/form equipment; just way more basic and immediate and therefore cooler. Check him out.

Castings in Aluminum



Ring VIII. Silver, Reused Wood

Detail: Wall Sculpture. Metal & Iron Waste

Canteen IV. Alpacca, Rubber. 54x22x15
Table, Wood. 2013. 25x58x28, 46x40x25, 64x30x25
Necklace. Silver, Alpaqua, Copper


Matt Lambert

What is jewellery and who’s allowed to wear it? I could’ve sworn I knew the answers to those questions until I checked out Matt Lambert. Gender, masculinity, queerness, viewer reaction to artistic expression, the meaning of masks, armour, sport and a whole lot of other stuff are all explored in his work. Unlike some of us who’re content to hammer away in our studios making subjectively pretty things, Lambert’s pieces articulate the experiences of men and those who identify as queer, topics that tend to gets drowned out in my humble opinion (as a mother to 3 young men) by everyone else screaming to be heard. But please, don’t take my word for it. Check out his website or his Instagram feed.

A bit about him; he was born and grew up in Detroit but spent half of each year in a ‘protected forest’ somewhere in Ontario. He has a Masters degree in Metalsmithing (2014), has apprenticed as a leathersmith and ‘semi-antique rug restorer. If that’s not enough he also has a BA in psychology and has studied art history and American studies.

An excerpt from his bio which honestly doesn’t make a lot of sense to me but you can see if it does for you…

‘Lambert’s work often looks at the blurring of systems and hegemonic scales/binaries, often combining technological and hand process to create hybrid/chimerical forms that directly engage or address the body. In 2016 Lambert became the first international artist trained in contemporary jewelry to be invited as an international resident for 2016-2017 with Iaspis the Swedish Arts Grants Committee’s international programme for visual artists and designers’.

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Leather necklace