Dorothea Prühl – One-off Exploration

Dorothea Prühl was born in Germany in 1937. She’s been a maker, teacher and curriculum influencer for a loooong time. Art School at the age of 19, a diploma at 25 and a teaching position at Burg Giebichenstein (the University of Art and Design, Halle, Germany) at the age of 29. I’m guessing that her experiences at art school; the rote learning of traditional techniques and styles later influenced her desire to teach her own students by ‘defying prescribed orientations towards design and without preconceptions about what constituted artworks.’ I imagine she must’ve ruffled a few feathers in the staff room with that unorthodox approach, but that didn’t stop her. In 1994 as director of the jewellery school at Burg Giebichenstein she started a more subjective approach, that of one-off exploration. I’m liking her already.

Prühl describes her own work as ‘spaciously gestural’. She says that it’s ‘based on a sculptural idea that takes proportion and scale into account. Concentration on essentials, empathy in the extreme and vigorous plasticity are the distinguishing features of these works. They are the critically reflected expression of an entirely subjective artistic agenda. More or less recognizable, the object visualized contains no subliminal messages; hence it permits no interpretations containing extrinsic references. These are works that are exactly what they purport to be. They are not ambivalent. There is no narration, none at all.

So, a departure from historical references, from cultural references? Modern? Individual? I get it.

I love this aluminum piece below even though it reminds me of pull tabs (which incidentally were invented in 1959 in case you were wondering).

Check out her website to see her full range of gorgeous one-off explorations. And maybe thank Dorothy Prühl, for helping to take jewellery design out of the hands of a few into the lives of many.

Collier aluminum 1966

Collier, aluminum. 1966

Star cherry wood 1999
Star, cherry wood. 1999
Tree animals gold, titanium 2002
Tree Animals, gold, titanium. 2002
Hawk, 2006 elm wood
Hawk, elm wood. 2006
Collar titanium stainless steel Gold 2014
Collar, titanium, stainless steel, gold. 2014

Luke Maninov Hammond

Have you ever wondered what the Biophilia Hypothesis is and what it has to do with jewellery? No? Me neither. But when I came across the work of Luke Maninov Hammond I decided to find out.

The word biophilia was first coined by the German social phychologist, psychoanalyst, sociologist and humanist philosopher Erich Fromm and it means ones’ innate ‘love for humanity and nature, and independence and freedom‘. In other words, we humans are naturally drawn to the life force, to survival itself. It’s a concept that Luke likes to explore in his jewellery and I’m guessing that’s because apart from his work as a jeweller he’s also a neuroscience imaging technician who spends a lot of time in the realm of high resolution 3D microscopic imagery of cellular forms within the brain. So while his scientific side facilitates the study of things like sleep and consciousness along with diseases such as Alzheimers and Schizophrenia, his artistic side ‘is focused on reimagining biological form to explore themes of impermanence, consciousness and the connection between all living things. Through the study of organic structures that define life his novel creations instil a sense of wonder whilst also connecting complex biological and metaphysical ideas’.

Take a look and see what you think…because thinking is what it’s all about 😉

-gold-shield-ring_ 18ct white and yellow gold, austalian parti shapphire
Gold Shield Ring. 18ct white and yellow gold, austalian parti sapphire
cerulean-odyssey- object. sterling silver, gold plating australian spphirrs, london blue topaz blue apphites white saphhires 300 mm tall
Cerulean Odyssey Object. sterling silver, gold plating, australian sapphires, london blue topaz, blue sapphires, white sapphires. 300 mm tall
silver-cajal-ring_.jpgsterling silver,patina yellow australian sapphire
Silver Cajal Ring. sterling silver, patina, yellow australian sapphire
upright-towers-ring_9ct rose gold and white diamond 31mm x 10mm x 2.7mm
Upright Towers Ring. 9ct rose gold, diamond
LMH_Surfacing-earringsblue green sapphires 14 ct gold
Surfacing Earrings. blue green sapphires, 14ct gold
luke-maninov-hammond--graceful inner-islands-cufflinks_oxidized silver fused gold leaf
Graceful Inner Islands Cufflinks. oxidized silver, fused gold leaf

Per Suntum

It takes 9 pages to cover the schooling, awards, grants and exhibitions on Danish Per Suntum’s website which translates into a highly skilled maker, who graduated from the Hans Hansen Silversmithy with a silver medal in 1965. Subtle, minimal and well crafted, Suntum says…

‘The basis for my work with jewellery is the singular moment,
where man meets material and
purpose stirs the soul
into expression’.

So if you’re into brooches, prepare to have your soul stirred.

belleblanche brooch 2007 silver
Belle Blanche. Brooch, 2007. Silver
calm luna brooch, 2010 silver, fine silver
Calm Luna. Brooch, 2010, Silver, Fine Silver
Savannah brooch 2013 shibuichi, 18kt gold, 18kt palladium-white gold
Savannah. Brooch, 2013. Shibuichi, 18kt Gold, 18kt Palladium-White Gold
closeup savannah
Closeup – Savannah Brooch
dive #2 brooch, 2005 silver, niello, enamel
Dive #2. Brooch, 2005. Silver, Niello, Enamel
interplay #4 brooch, 2011. Isolith, 18kt gold, silver
Interplay #4. Brooch, 2011. Isolith, 18kt Gold, Silver
pinfungi brooch 2005 silver, niello
Pinfungi. Brooch 2005. Silver, Niello
sea flower brooch 2005 silver
Sea Flower. Brooch, 2005. Silver
thisearth - this jewel brooch 2010 24kt gold, diamond cone
This Earth – This Jewel. Brooch, 2010. 24kt Gold, Diamond Cone

Fabrizio Tridenti

If I could understand the Italian language I might be able to make sense of this makers’ artist statement (see below) which I’m guessing has been translated from Italian to English. Sadly I don’t understand so all I can tell you about Fabrizio Tridenti is that he was born in Italy, that he graduated from the Istituto Statale d’Arte, Penne, in Metals and Jewelry Design in Italy in 1982, that he apprenticed between 1983 and 1992 and that he opened his own studio in Pescara in 1993.

So let’s let his work speak for him; the twisting, rusted, industrial clash of angles pushing in all directions…bella!

p.s. I apologize for not having titles for some of the images here. Hopefully you’ll enjoy them anyway 🙂

 

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Untitled, 2009. Bronze, acryclic enamel

 

2010-2-Premio-FABRIZIO-TRIDENTI-

Anello, alluminio, pittura acrilica 2010
Untitled, 2010, brass, acrylic paint
Untitled, 2010 Brooch brass steel acrylic enamel
Untitled, brooch, 2010. Brass, steel, acrylic enamel

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Restricted Area, 2010, brass, acrylic paint
Restricted Area, 2010, brass, acrylic paint

 

Artist statement from klimt02

Jewels cannot be confined within the limits of their function. Through liberating jewels from these limits, infinite experimentation fields are opened, which may lead to fruitful artistic experiences. The founding assumption of these attempts is the wish to return the central role to the intangible aspect in relation to the tangible aspect of jewels. 

By asserting the primacy of the intangible aspects, jewels are seen from a different perspective, an entire scale of values is refounded, with the privilege for the finest perceptions. 

Another aspect combining these attempts with conceptual art is the indifference towards the aesthetic value, which is strictly connected with the formal value. 

The main purpose of this work is to provoke reactions, start discussions, rouse considerations, and open new debates on jewels. The point is shifting the focus from the aesthetic to the intellectual experience, or rather the aesthetic experience is the intellectual experience. 

To obtain this result, the direction followed was to confute the traditional aspects of jewels: the functional, formal, and aesthetic values. 

“Virtual” is a way to create the visibility of what cannot be realized in the tangible dimension. The new technology offers these new expressive opportunities. 
The idea of the body or body parts as jewels also develops: a sort of zero degree of jewels. It can also be considered as an inversion operation: the body changes from traditional support of jewels to jewel itself; from background, it turns into protagonist (subject).
In the photo “the room as bracelet”, the concept of jewel is reversed: traditionally, hard materials are made to surround the body. On the contrary, in this case the body is an accessory of an architectural structure. This inversion appears not only as a limitation of movements, but universally as the present condition of human beings suffocated by structures produced by the society. A house is not considered as a shelter and protection, but as a limit to our ability to move, expand, an inorganic, static, and unchangeable shell for an organic, dynamic, and continuously growing creature. In this condition, these barriers can only be crossed through thought. 
In the photo “ring”, the concept of ring is brought to the extreme consequences of dematerialization. Not only the ring does not exist, but also the part of the body supporting it is removed. The visual result is anyhow that of a ring, a ring of “absence”. However, while the object is self-limited in a shape, here the absence of the object gives space to the observer to imagine something, a personal ring. Therefore, this creatively activates and interacts with the observer. 
I want to exploit our bigger attraction for what we cannot see, for what is not there, for what is indefinite. 
“It seems to me that ’Nothing’ is the most powerful thing in the world”, said Robert Barry. 
For me, art is not an exact science. There is no evidenced truth. Art is a field where creativity experiments infinite directions towards freedom. Art responds to the stimulations of contemporary culture and uses the scientific and technological progress and knowledge in all their branches. 

Fabrizio Tridenti

William Llewellyn Griffiths

Self-taught and fabulous, William Llewellyn Griffiths proves you don’t need to set foot in a jewellery school to make some pretty cool jewellery. Motifs and references from medieval, renaissance and baroque architecture rise up from his rings holding sparkling gems in silver and gold. Skilled in lost wax carving and more recently 3D printing I can’t believe the amount of detail he creates. If you want to see more of his work you can check out his website here.

alchemist-ring-low-res5-600x600
Alchemist Ring, 9ct yellow Gold, Topaz
Blackhearted Cupid Ring Smokey quartz, Death and Glory Collection
Blackhearted Cupid Ring, Smokey Quartz from Death and Glory Collection
Efflorescence ring, Tanzanite, tsavorite garnets ruby petals
Efflorescence Ring, Tanzanite, Tsavorite Garnets, Ruby
garnet-ruby-skull-eyes-low-res5
Enthroned Immortality Ring, Garnet, Ruby, Diamonds
Obesession Ring, 18k gold, rose gold morganite, diamonds
Obsession Ring, 18k gold, rose gold, Morganite, Diamonds

 

Matt Lambert

What is jewellery and who’s allowed to wear it? I could’ve sworn I knew the answers to those questions until I checked out Matt Lambert. Gender, masculinity, queerness, viewer reaction to artistic expression, the meaning of masks, armour, sport and a whole lot of other stuff are all explored in his work. Unlike some of us who’re content to hammer away in our studios making subjectively pretty things, Lambert’s pieces articulate the experiences of men and those who identify as queer, topics that tend to gets drowned out in my humble opinion (as a mother to 3 young men) by everyone else screaming to be heard. But please, don’t take my word for it. Check out his website or his Instagram feed.

A bit about him; he was born and grew up in Detroit but spent half of each year in a ‘protected forest’ somewhere in Ontario. He has a Masters degree in Metalsmithing (2014), has apprenticed as a leathersmith and ‘semi-antique rug restorer. If that’s not enough he also has a BA in psychology and has studied art history and American studies.

An excerpt from his bio which honestly doesn’t make a lot of sense to me but you can see if it does for you…

‘Lambert’s work often looks at the blurring of systems and hegemonic scales/binaries, often combining technological and hand process to create hybrid/chimerical forms that directly engage or address the body. In 2016 Lambert became the first international artist trained in contemporary jewelry to be invited as an international resident for 2016-2017 with Iaspis the Swedish Arts Grants Committee’s international programme for visual artists and designers’.

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Leather necklace

Natalie Xinzi Song

Bracelet: Unknown Creature, 2015 Silicone , pigment
Bracelet: Unknown Creature, 2015. Silicone, pigment

Natalie Xinzi Song studied at the Beijing Institute of Fashion and Technology before obtaining her Masters degree in Jewellery from the Birmingham School of Jewellery. What I love about her work (which includes jewellery, bowls and vases) is that (A) it’s different, (B) it’s colourful and (C) it reminds me of life at a cellular level, like photographs from an electron microscope showing organic fractals. The repetitive forms are mesmerizing.

From her artist statement on Klimt02…

‘My silicone work focuses on forms and textures. I aim to create functional objects with innovative appearance by balancing form and function. The forms of my work were created by repeating, arranging and organizing simple elements into complex patterns and structures.
As a group of objects, my work contrasts with, and compliments each other in terms of form, texture, colour and scale. I attempted to create connection between the objects and the surrounding space. The objects create intriguing negative space as well as being complete pieces individually’

Bracelet:Unknown Creature, 2015 Silicone, pigment
Bracelet: Unknown Creature, 2015. silicone, pigment
DSC01375m
work in progress
DSC01958m
第 1 张,共 9 张
Unknown Creature 2015 silcone pigment
Bracelet: Unknown Creature, 2015. silicone rubber
Untitled, 2011 Silicone rubber 1
Untitled, 2011. silicone rubber
Untitled, 2011 Silicone rubber
Untitled, 2011. silicone rubber

Patricia Gallucci

Patricia Gallucci has explored many creative pursuits over the years. From an early age she played with clay and fabric ‘My hands filled with clay and oil mixed between plasticine and vinegar dough, salt and tempera‘. As an adult she studied industrial design, clothing design, photography, stoneware pottery, pastry making and porcelain, product design and production management in apparel. All this before studying contemporary jewellery from 2008 to 2012. And just loooook at what she’s made since then…

p.s. I had a difficult time limiting the number of images for this post but if you’d like to see more you can follow her on Instagram here.

 

 

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Aros “Alcornoque”
SONY DSC
Aros earrings
Brooch #1
Brooch #1
patricia gallucci Broken
Porcelain collar
patricia galluci
Collar Ovalo Interiores

 

serve ring. Silver and industrial waste (cork)
“Serve” ring, silver and industrial waste (cork)
SONY DSC
Manga earrings, porcelain and silver
Ring Grace and edu Cork bronze
Ring Grace and edu cork, bronze

 

Iris Bodemer

If I ever won some massive amount of money (which would be difficult because I don’t buy lottery tickets) one of the things I’d indulge in would be to travel to Florence to enrol in any course taught by Iris Bodemer. She lives and works in Germany but sometimes lectures at Alchimia and I’d love to attend one of her weekend workshops there. I’d love to hear about how she approaches a project as well as what and where she draws on for her inspiration. I see both ancient and contemporary influences in her pieces and they come together with such considered precision, as though she’d planned it from the beginning (unlike me who plans as I go and am therefore not Iris Bodemer).

I won’t attempt to list all of her exhibitions and shows on this blog so please check out her website here, and if you find yourself in Florence in July this year she’ll be a guest lecturer at Alchimia for ‘Entropy + Entities’. Me? I guess I’ll have to start buying lottery tickets.

Notes Necklace 2016 bronze
Notes Necklace, 2016, bronze
Notes ring 2016, bronze..bronze aquamarine..silver..silver, aquamarine
Notes Rings, 2016. clockwise from top left – bronze, bronze + aquamarine, silver, silver + aquamarine
Notes, necklace 2016, silver
Notes Necklace , 2016, silver
Relief II 34 Brooches, 2013 silver
Relief II, 2013, 34 brooches, silver
notes ring 2016, bronze, silver, silver
Notes Rings, 2016, bronze, silver
Notes Brooch 2016 Bronze Andean opal
Notes Brooch, 2016, bronze, andean opal
neckpiece, 2012 silver, citrine
Neckpiece, 2012, silver, citrine

Geraldine Nishi

Untitled ring concrete, silver
Untitled, ring: concrete, silver

I don’t know about you but when I look at some of Geraldine Nishi’s work I see luscious cake frosting and ice cream piled high onto rings and necklaces. Yum.

Nishi obtained her Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours in Sculpture and Painting) from UVic before studying at Alchimia Contemporary Jewellery School in Florence (2005 – 2009)

You can check out more of her work on her website here.

Untitled, necklace, concrete, silver, paint
Untitled, necklace : concrete, silver, paint
Untitled, ring, concrete silver
Untitled, ring : silver, concrete
untitled, object- shibuichi
Untitled, object : shibuichi
untitled, pins - wood, paint, silver
Untitled, pins : wood, paint, silver