Marian Hosking – Fragments of the Landscape

Worn Gum Brooch, 2017. Blackened Silver
“I am not so interested in a pictorial space, but rather in capturing a slice or
fragment of a larger whole to trigger a memory in the viewer of a larger
vista or place.”
Marian Hosking via Docplayer
 

I think of Marian Hosking as both a jeweller and master recorder of the native plant and landscape material of Australia. Rather than pressing flowers and leaves into dusty books or copying them as sketches into some leather-bound journal she’s spent 40 years recreating their unique beauty in silver, wood and other materials.

Growing up in the bush and near the beach with her conservationist mother and metallurgist father you might say that Hosking was destined for the life she’s led. She knew in high school that she wanted to study gold and silversmithing and in 1969 graduated from RMIT (Master of Arts) before travelling to Europe where she continued her studies in the jewellers’ mecca of Pforzheim, Germany. Four years later she would return to the town of Wagga Wagga in Australia to teach at the university there. And in 1975, on returning to Melbourne she opened her own studio.  Some 5 years after that she would became a director and founding member of Workshop 3000 located in the heart of the city, a place where jewellers could rent studio space and collaborate. 4 years later and with the birth of her 2nd child she would return to her solo studio.

Her contributions to craft in Australia were recognized in 2007 when the Australian Design Centre named her a ‘Living Treasure of Australia, Master of Australian Craft’.  And as if that wasn’t good enough she obtained a PhD at Monash University in 2009 where she was a Senior Lecturer in the Art, Design and Architecture department there until 2014.

Soooo, if you ever find yourself in Melbourne (and I hope you do one day) you’ll find this maker’s work represented at Gallery Funaki. Failing that there’s always her profile on Instagram here…when she decides to post something 😉

Gum Caps Brooch
Wrap Rings (Ongoing Edition). Sterling Silver and Blackened Sterling Silver
Detail: Gum Twig Chain
Wattle Bud Necklace, 2009. Blackened Silver
Weathered Wood, 2017. Wood, Paint, Silver
Coralline, 2015. Blackened Silver

Mysterious Taiji Tsuna

There’s something fearless about a goldsmith who doesn’t feature gemstones in their pieces, who focuses instead on the quiet raw nature of the metal itself, with minimalist forms and rough textures dressed simply in fusions of silver and gold. Those blackened encrusted surfaces speak of being lost in time, of being unearthed, of being precious. This is the work of Taiji Tsuna (aka Yasushi Jona & Taiji Tomona)

Jona is Tsuna’s jewellery label and there’s not much more information about this maker except that he or she was born in Hiroshima, Japan in 1964. Educated at the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music with a BA in Craft (Metal Hammering -1989) and later a masters degree (Metal Hammering – 1991), Tsuna held a number of positions as a professional jeweller between 1991 and 2005 when he or she became a freelance designer.

A mysterious maker who doesn’t seem to name their creations, you can check out more about Jona Jewellery on instagram here.

Silver + Heat

In my small world there’s nothing quite as beautiful as organic texture; like the chunky rough planes of a mountain rock face cut in light and shadow, or the layered hide of a tree trunk, gnarled by decades. I find it difficult capturing those surfaces on a piece of metal though. Yes, I’ve carved a replica of a natural texture in wax and although I’ve not tried it I could make a rubber mold of an organic object and cast it. Or there’s sand and surface casting that make some great textures too.

Pink Wax Texture Experiment
Blue Wax Carving

Sand Casting of Coral

But is there a way to transform a smooth piece of sterling silver wire or sheet into chaotic gorgeousness without all that fuss and equipment? If you own a propane or acetylene torch and a ceramic brick then the answer is yes…because sterling silver + heat = texture.

It’s good to know (especially if you’re new to jewellery making) that sterling silver is made up of 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper (added to increase hardness). As you heat it with a gentle to medium flame it begins to glow dark red. At that moment the piece is annealed…previously disorganized molecules become more organized. With continued heating molecules of copper in the piece which have a higher melting point than the silver begin to migrate to the surface. You’ll know this because the surface will turn from silver to black.

Copper (AKA Fire-scale) on Sterling Silver Wire

If you quench the piece (in water) and pickle it (in an acid solution which removes the fire-scale) and repeat that heat/quench/pickle cycle 10-15 times, a layer of pure silver will gradually accumulate at the surface while the copper beneath (remember it has a higher melting point) will begin to ripple with the silver flowing over it. And that’s where the weird wavy patterns on the surface become apparent. The process is called reticulation and you can read more about it here. I love the randomness of it and am playing with my heat level and the surface I’m melting on – ceramic brick, charcoal etc. So many variables and so much fun.

Below is my latest sampling of textured bits and pieces; 2 twigs that I sand casted, a large (6 gauge) link (bottom left), a twist of brass wire I fused with sterling silver (top centre) and some molten silver plops that formed when I heated them on my brick. And it’s those plops that have me all excited about trying to make larger pieces. It’s that particular gritty texture that I’m looking for. It’s not a mountain cliff or a tree trunk but it’s getting close. 🙂

Cheers.

Reticulated Samples

Karen Vanmol

Let’s be honest here…who likes laminate; the low budget, plastic and ugly imposter of natural materials like stone or wood that’s used for furniture and countertops? How about laminate as a material for jewellery? And how about jewellery that doesn’t rely solely on the intensive mining of gemstones and precious metals? Welcome to the world of maker Karen Vanmol.

Inspired by architecture and nature Vanmol designs using traditional techniques like hinging, threading and sawing to create her graphically bold pieces. And she’s fascinated with paradolia – the psychological phenomenon that describes how we humans try to make sense of random stimuli or patterns – if you’ve ever gazed at a cloud in the sky and decided it looks like a horse or a flower or whatever, or seen a face when you look at the moon, then you’ve experienced paradolia.

Necklace: AKA#ISEEFACES, 2018. Wood, Laminate, Blackened Silver, Cotton Thread

She describes some of her process here…

‘Protecting or imitating nature, the use of natural materials in architecture, the restoring of a road surface, accidental strong shapes on a construction site, these things I find very interesting.

On my way through town, I hunt and collect. I always encounter interesting images that I use as an inspiration. In addition, there is a certain choice of materials and colours, these are strongly influenced by memories. For example the necklaces, furniture in different colours, certain constructions. I have my story and the viewer projects its own story on top of mine.

I always start from my sources of inspiration, with these eyes I look around me. Next to that I make jewellery and I like to use my tools and try out how materials reacts to them. Eventually I work with materials, and that provides an additional factor. I find out the properties they possess and how I can edit them and this will count in the final result. Some techniques I use are common and you can find them in your house’. (via Klimt02)

I’m loving the intensity of her pieces, the colours, the shapes, the clean lines AND the fact that she’s able to use a material like laminate (so it stays off countertops). You can find out more about Karen on her website or Instagram.

Earrings : Koloro Gemo Collection
2 Finger Ring
Necklace : AKA#ISEEFACES, 2017. Wood, Laminate, Patinated Silver
Necklace : Fading Landscapes, 2011. Wood, Paint, Gold Leaf, Brass, Cotton

Ring : Under Construction, 2010. Wood, Concrete, Paint, Cotton, Silver

Jorge Manilla

3 Oscure Sacrifices, 2015. Necklace, Leather, Tumbag

I wonder how many parents (with the best intentions) redirect their children from a career in art. And how many children grow up and eventually find their way back to it anyway. As a teenager Jorge Manilla wanted to be an artist like his father and grandfather (both were traditionally trained goldsmiths and engravers). But when the 15 year old told his mother he wanted to become a sculptor she threatened to kick him out of the house if he didn’t focus on a real career…like boxing (a prestigious national sport in his native Mexico).

“That was the moment of one of the biggest decisions in my life, and with it I decided to go completely into boxing and work for a sculptor. And this saved my life in every way. Boxing gave me discipline and structure and a clear mind to decide the next step in my life.” (via: Oslo National Academy of Arts)

Several years later and in need of extra cash Manilla was thinking of leaving boxing and began doing modelling for drawing classes at the San Carlos Art Academy in Mexico City. It was there that he decided to study drawing and sculpture (1994-1997) and later jewellery and silversmithing at the National Institute of Fine Arts (INBA), Mexico City, Mexico (1998-2002). He would go on to obtain a Bachelors degree in Sculpture (2002-2003) at the Royal Academy of Arts in Ghent, Belgium and a Masters in Jewellery and Silversmithing (2003-2006) from St Lucas University College of Art and Design in Antwerp. He moved to Belgium in 2003 lives and is currently working on his PhD at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp.

As a non-expert in the field of jewellery I experience an underlying uneasiness when I look at Manilla’s work, something that both disturbs and invites at the same time. Blackened, bulging and mammalian in a weird way, but oh sooo tactile. But he explains what that’s about…

My central themes are human feelings, death and life. Each piece is like a small altar – physiological, emotional and religious. I like to translate this into materials. Mexicans are very bodily – we say hello, kiss, hug and touch hands. To me, touching is very important, and I am really into natural material, like leather, wood, stones and human bones, because they are related to my cultural past, and the materials have tactility, temperature and heaviness.”  (via: Oslo National Academy of Arts)

I highly recommend checking out Manilla’s website here where you’ll see the full breadth of his work and get a peak into why he does what he does. Pretty amazing.

Without Title, 2008. Necklace. Cardboard, Silver, Cotton Thread
Polvo de Amor Quebrado, 2011. ‘Please Do Not Take My Heart’. Necklace. Leather, Wood, Cotton Thread, Copper

4 Oscure Sacrifices. Necklace. Leather, Wood, Acryl Hars, Steel
Impossible to Imagine II, 2015. Leather, Steel, Wood, Silver
Bled, Jorge Manilla Navarrete, Schmuck, 2017


Detail: Bled, Jorge Manilla Navarrete, Schmuck, 2017
There Is Nothing To Be Afraid Of, 2016. ‘Some Moments To Remember’ Brooch. Wood, Casted Acrylic Gypsum, Brass

Jenny Anderson

Anderson studied fashion design prior to obtaining a bachelors degree in metalsmithing/silversmithing and is currently attending technical college to obtain a certificate in engineering. Wow! I think it’s so cool that she sets precious metals and stones against blackened steel, paint and gorgeous found objects, always with a keen eye on form, volume and craft.
Now, this is a tiny sampling of her work below, so please do yourself a favour and check out her Instagram feed here which is more current than her website, because, you know, who has time to keep a website up to date when you can just post to Instagram. I’m with you on that point Jenny 🙂

 

U Shape ring. Steel

Interactive box ring. Sterling silver

Chain earrings. Sterling silver

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Black steel bangles